Year 8 Religion and World Views: BUDDHISM 5. Stories from the Buddha: the Eightfold Path

New Learning Unit: STORIES FROM THE BUDDHA
Today’s learning skills: putting ideas into diagram form/ new knowledge quiz
Target time: 60 minutes

Welcome to week 5 of exploring Buddhism. So far, we have explored how Siddhartha Gautama’s life changed from a life of luxury in a palace, to a life of poverty (being poor) in the forest. He left the palace for the forest because he had seen illness, old age, death and the peace of a holy man (the Four Sights). It changed him. Finally, when neither luxury nor poverty gave him any answers, he sat beneath a bodhi tree and meditated. Here, he became enlightened (awakened to how life is). He became the Buddha. Last week, we looked at the Four Noble Truths that Buddha taught.

Today we’re going to go further into the Dhamma, Buddha’s teachings, and see what his cure for suffering is! It’s a way of living called the Eightfold Path. We’re also going to think about WHO can follow these teachings.

Today’s learning: Stories from the Buddha.

What is the Eightfold Path and who can follow it?

Objectives

I can: pull all my new learning on Buddhism together into a piece of writing, using my Buddhism notes to help me.

So that:
I can showcase how much I have learned about Buddhism!

Equipment

Blank paper/ pen or pencils/ colours if you want them OR set up a word document or powerpoint if you want to work on a computer

The ‘I ROCK AS I ALREADY KNOW!’ quick quiz: check yourself out

1.What phrase describes the 4 things Siddhartha saw when he left his palace for the first time?

The Four Sights.

2. Siddhartha became the Buddha as he sat under the bodhi tree. What was he doing under that tree?

He was meditating. This is a form of quiet concentration where you try to discipline your mind.

3.What did Siddhartha realise existed in the world after seeing the 4 sights? 

He realised that the world was full of suffering.

4.Siddhartha realised that life should be lived in the Middle Way between two extremes. What were the two extremes of living he had tried in his life?

He had lived in luxury (in the palace with his father) and he had lived in poverty (with the monks in the forest).

5. Buddhist writings say that Buddha is like a doctor. How can Buddha be like a doctor?

Buddha saw that all humans have the same ‘illness’ of suffering. He said he could cure us of it! He also showed us how.

6.Buddha taught the Four Noble Truths. What is the first truth that he taught out of these four truths?

That life is about suffering! If we can begin from that realisation, then life is already a little easier as we know what to expect.

1. Listen to this story about a woman called Kisa Gotami, as told by a Buddhist monk. It’s about the First Noble Truth. Life is about suffering. Everyone suffers. It’s just part of being human.

This teaching takes place in a vihara, which is a Buddhist temple. The person talking is a monk. He has shaved his head, wears simples robes and lives the way that Buddha lived, even now in the 21st century. Look at the room around him as he talks. You may see a statue of Buddha, (called a Buddharupa), and see candles, flowers and objects shaped like lotus flowers. We’re going to find out more about those things in another lesson. See what you think of the story.

2. Well done! Now, set up a new thinking page for today

Our little booklet of pages is coming together nicely! We should now have 5 pages: title page/ Siddhartha as a baby/ the Four Sights/ Enlightenment poem page/ the Four Noble Truths page.

Today- set up a new page. Either on your computer as a powerpoint or word document or a paper page.

Put today’s lesson title at the top of it. ‘STORIES FROM THE BUDDHA: The Eightfold Path’. (You’ll find an example page I’ve made further below).

3. WHAT IS THE EIGHTFOLD PATH?

Read this information. It has two pages, so be sure to scroll down.

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3. Creating the Eightfold Path

On your paper/ document, you are going to do the following things. If you get stuck, check out the page below this section with my example page.

1. Draw or cut out or create a wheel with eight sections to it.

2. In each section of the wheel, write in and DRAW a symbol for each part of the Eightfold Path. Use the text in the pages above to help you. For example, you would write RIGHT ATTITUDE into one section and the sentence that it explains it too. Then you’d draw a symbol to show that- like maybe a stick person smiling at someone else.

3. Then, add the title ‘The Eightfold Path’ to it. Check out the example page underneath to show you what it might look like.

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BONUS CHALLENGE: if you’re feeling creative, have a go at making a piece of jewellery showing the 3 jewels. Could make it out of paper, play-doh, bread dough, anything you like! Photograph it & send it in!

Here’s an example page of today’s learning to support you if you need help

1.The word SANGHA means community. True or false?

True

2. All Buddhists become monks and nuns. True or false?

False. There are two groups in the Buddhist sangha. Lay people- like you and me- and monks and nuns who take vows.

3. A lay Buddhist could be a butcher, killing animals, for a living. True or false?

False. If you follow the eightfold path guidance on Right Job (or Livelihood), you must not harm living things, so you could not be a butcher.

4. If you’re a Buddhist, you should hold grudges against people (feel hatred towards them). True or false?

No, Right Thought and Right Effort means you try to be kind and have goodwill towards others. 

5. Buddhists meditate to keep their mind calm and clear. True or false?

True. The main form of spiritual practice for Buddhists is meditation. This is the guidance on Right Concentration.

5. Buddhists meditate to keep their mind calm and clear. True or false?

True.The main form of spiritual practice for Buddhists is meditation. This is the guidance of the eightfold path called Right Concentration.

6. A Buddhist could be a soldier on a battlefield. True or false?

This is like the butcher example. Do not harm living things. Most Buddhists tend to be vegetarian (not eat meat) for the same reason.

7. Buddhists think that it’s okay to tell lies to protect people. True or false?

False- you should tell the truth. This is Right Speech and Right Mindfulness. Even if lying might protect someone, we should tell the truth with kindness.

6. A Buddhist could be a soldier on a battlefield. True or false?

This is like the butcher example. Do not harm living things. Most Buddhists tend to be vegetarian (not eat meat) for the same reason.

7. Buddhists think that it’s okay to tell lies to protect people. True or false?

False- you should tell the truth. This is Right Speech and Right Mindfulness. Even if lying might protect someone, we should tell the truth with kindness.

8. Buddhists believe that life is about suffering. We should all try and accept that. True or false?

This is true. It’s the first of the Four Noble Truths and is also the Right View of life.

9. The symbol of Buddhism is a tree. True or false?

False. The bodhi tree is where Siddhartha became the Buddha, but it is not the symbol of Buddhism. The symbol is the Dhammachakra or the wheel. It represents the eightfold path.

10. Buddha taught that the Eightfold Path is a cure for our suffering.

True!

YOU ROCK!

Today we’ve finished our learning about Buddhism! Well done you! You’ve actually written a small book and used your expertise on Buddhism to write a film overview! You have brought two brand new things into the world that didn’t exist only 7 weeks ago! How amazing is that?

Wishing you a gorgeous summer holiday! By the way, if you want to do more on Buddhism over the summer- there will be another blog next week with some creative tasks for you, like tattoo designs and flag making!

WHAT DO I DO WITH MY AMAZING WORK?

Simply send your work to your teacher. And remember, all these pages are making a booklet week by week!

katie.jackson@clf.uk

Sarah.power@clf.uk

Holly.cole@clf.uk